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A Beginner's Guide to Constructing the Universe

The Mathematical Archetypes of Nature, Art, and Science
Paperback Book
Publisher: 
HarperCollins
 | 
October, 1995
ISBN:
9780060926717
In stock now: 
3
$23.99 CAD
Banyen's Description: 

This surprisingly fascinating book leads us on a spectacular, lavishly illustrated journey along the numbers one through ten to explore the mathematical principles made visible in flowers, shells, crystals, plants, and the human body, expressed in the symbolic language of folk sayings and fairy tales, myth and religion, art and architecture. This new view of mathematics (probably not the one we learned at school) is a comprehensive guide to the patterns that recur through the universe and underlie human affairs. A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe shows you:

·    why cans, pizza, and manhole covers are round

·    why one and two weren’t considered numbers by the ancient Greeks

·    why squares show up so often in goddess art and board games

·    what property makes the spiral the most widespread shape in nature, from embryos and hair curls to hurricanes and galaxies

·    how the human body shares the design of a bean plant and the solar system

·    how a snowflake is like Stonehenge, and a beehive like a calendar

·    how our ten fingers hold the secrets of both a lobster and a cathedral

·    and much more

“In this book you will find something that cannot be obtained elsewhere, a complete introduction to the geometric code of nature, written and illustrated by the most perceptive of its modern investigators.” —from the Preface by John Michell

In his final chapter, a part of which is called “Better Living through Geometry,” Schneider says,

This book is about reshaping our vision and constructing a new perspective aligned with life-facts. Learning nature’s language and reading its message helps abolish the attitude to separateness and encourages us to appreciate diversity. It will lead to nothing less than our own transformation as we find all nature’s principles within ourselves.

To learn to resee the world in terms of its patterns requires a shift within us. But once this shift occurs and we see the familiar world in terms of its shapes and principles, a light turns on and the world brightens, comes into sharper relief. Everything speaks its purpose through its patterns. Even without knowing it we use the same designs found in nature. Look at a microscopic diatom and see a cathedral rose window. Ultimately, the same energy that motivates and guides the natural world does the same for us. All universal designs are found in human body proportions, which we have seen can be repackaged to produce the proportions of a crystal, plant, animal, solar system, and galaxy. It is as if the universe is one single organism, motivated by a single power, developing in many ways to gradually become aware of itself through the awareness of creatures and forces it produces.

Publisher’s Description: 

 

The Universe May Be a Mystery,
But It's No Secret

 

Michael Schneider leads us on a spectacular, lavishly illustrated journey along the numbers one through ten to explore the mathematical principles made visible in flowers, shells, crystals, plants, and the human body, expressed in the symbolic language of folk sayings and fairy tales, myth and religion, art and architecture. This is a new view of mathematics, not the one we learned at school but a comprehensive guide to the patterns that recur through the universe and underlie human affairs. A Beginner's Guide to Constructing, the Universe shows you:

 

  • Why cans, pizza, and manhole covers are round.

     

     

  • Why one and two weren't considered numbers by the ancient Greeks.

     

     

  • Why squares show up so often in goddess art and board games.

     

     

  • What property makes the spiral the most widespread shape in nature, from embryos and hair curls to hurricanes and galaxies.

     

     

  • How the human body shares the design of a bean plant and the solar system.

     

     

  • How a snowflake is like Stonehenge, and a beehive like a calendar.

     

     

  • How our ten fingers hold the secrets of both a lobster and a cathedral.

     

     

  • And much more.

 

Michael Schneider leads us on a spectacular, lavishly illustrated journey along the numbers one through ten to explore the mathematical principles made visible in flowers, shells, crystals, plants, and the human body, expressed in the symbolic language of folk sayings and fairy tales, myth and religion, art and architecture. This is a new view of mathematics, not the one we learned at school but a comprehensive guide to the patterns that recur throughout the universe and underlie human affairs.

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