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Ganesha Goes to Lunch

Classics from Mystic India
Paperback Book
Publisher: 
Mandala
 | 
April, 2007
ISBN:
9781601091024
Quantity: 
2
$21.99 CAD
Banyen's Description: 

This accessible and beautifully illuminated collection of ancient India’s most insightful and philosophical tales and myths celebrates well-known stories and others that are small, unnoticed gems, not readily known to Western readers.

King Kubera was the greediest man in the world. Hated and feared by many, he schemed to win the love of the beautiful goddess Parvati… but learned an important lesson when he invited her elephant-headed son Ganesha over for lunch one day…

Epics of ancient India rank with the timeless myths of classical Greece and Rome in the power of their language and the underlying moral lessons. The Ramayana and Mahabharata, both written in Sanskrit, contain vibrant stories of kings and princes, sages and tricksters, demons and gods, damsels in distress and mighty heroes. Ganesha Goes to Lunch collects some of the most vivid stories from these and other early Indian folklore and spiritual texts including the Vedas and the Puranas. These stories feature the gods of India in their celestial and earthly abodes, hapless humans struggling with life’s many problems, and gods and humans interacting.

There are many delightful tales in this decidedly grown-up book. How about the time that Vishnu sank into the ocean, was incarnated as a pig, and had a really wonderful time? Monkey gods, talking toads, and beautiful maidens in distress… Even wild old stories from the author’s hometown, where naked, dreadlocked holy men speed about on motorbikes!

 Assembled by Kamla Kapur, these stories illustrate the great spiritual and practical themes of the human condition. Kamla Kapur brings her poet’s eye and ear to the retelling of these stories, recreating and dramatizing them to illuminate their relevance to modern times.

 

Publisher’s Description: 

These are legendary tales of ancient India. Some are celebrated and well known, others are small, unnoticed gems, not readily known to Western readers. The stories, though often short, encapsulate some of life’s essential truths. The gods of India in their abodes, humans struggling with life’s problems, and gods and humans interacting all reveal the essential lessons of life. The collection contains adaptations from the Mahabharata, Ramayana, Puranas and the Vedic stories, all illustrating the great spiritual and practical themes of the human condition. Kamla Kapur brings her poet’s eye and ear to the retelling of these stories, recreating and dramatizing them to illuminate their relevance to modern times.

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