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The One-Straw Revolution

An Introduction to Natural Farming
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2
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3
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Paperback Book
Publisher: 
Random House
 | 
June, 2009
ISBN:
9781590173138
Quantity: 
3
$18.95 CAD
Banyen's Description: 

Masanobu Fukuoka’s book about growing food has been changing the lives of readers since it was first published in 1978. It is a call to arms, a manifesto, and a radical rethinking of the global systems we rely on to feed us all. At the same time, it is the memoir of a man whose spiritual beliefs underpin and inform every aspect of his innovative farming system.

Equal parts farmer and philosopher,
Fukuoka
is recognized as one of the founding thinkers of the permaculture movement. But when he was twenty-five, he was just another biologist taking advantage of the unprecedented development of postwar
Japan
. Then a brush with death shattered his complacency. He quit his job and returned to his family farm. Over the decades that followed, Fukuoka perfected his so-called “do-nothing” technique, a way of farming that dispenses with both modern agribusiness practices and centuries of folk wisdom, replacing them with a system that seeks to work with nature rather than make it over through increasingly elaborate—and often harmful—methods. His farm became a gathering place for people from all over the world who wished to adapt his ways to their own local cultures.


Fukuoka
explains natural farming in his writings:

We can make healthy rice, healthy and rich soil that requires no fertilizer, and have productive soil without tilling if we just accept the fact that such excessive efforts—tilling, application of either organic, chemical fertilizers, or pesticides—has never been necessary A farming method that develops the conditions under which people do not have to do anything—this is what I have been pursuing. After thirty years I finally came to the point where my natural farm could yield, without any effort, virtually as much rice and wheat as typical scientific farms.

Now, more than thirty years after they were first published,
Fukuoka
’s teachings are more relevant than ever.

Masanobu Fukuoka died at home on his farm at the age of 95 in August, 2008.

Publisher’s Description: 

Call it Zen and the Art of Farming or a Little Green Book, Masanobu Fukuokas manifesto about farming, eating, and the limits of human knowledge presents a radical challenge to the global systems we rely on for our food. At the same time, it is a spiritual memoir of a man whose innovative system of cultivating the earth reflects a deep faith in the wholeness and balance of the natural world. As Wendell Berry writes in his preface, the book is valuable to us because it is at once practical and philosophical. It is an inspiring, necessary book about agriculture because it is not just about agriculture.

Trained as a scientist, Fukuoka rejected both modern agribusiness and centuries of agricultural practice, deciding instead that the best forms of cultivation mirror natures own laws. Over the next three decades he perfected his so-called do-nothing technique: commonsense, sustainable practices that all but eliminate the use of pesticides, fertilizer, tillage, and perhaps most significantly, wasteful effort.

Whether youre a guerrilla gardener or a kitchen gardener, dedicated to slow food or simply looking to live a healthier life, you will find something hereyou may even be moved to start a revolution of your own.Masanobu Fukuoka's book about growing food has been changing the lives of readers since it was first published in 1978. It is a call to arms, a manifesto, and a radical rethinking of the global systems we rely on to feed us all. At the same time, it is the memoir of a man whose spiritual beliefs underpin and inform every aspect of his innovative farming system.

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