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Rumi: Bridge to the Soul

Journeys into the Music and Silence of the Heart
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Hardcover Book
Publisher: 
HarperCollins
 | 
September, 2007
ISBN:
9780061338168
In stock now: 
3
$24.99 CAD
Banyen's Description: 

Coleman Barks, who was recently awarded an honorary doctorate in Persian language and literature by the University of Tehran for his 30 years of translating Rumi, has collected and translated 90 new poems, most of them never published before in any form. The result is this beautiful edition titled Rumi: Bridge to the Soul. The “bridge” in the title is a reference to the Khajou Bridge in Isphahan, Iran, which Barks visited with Robert Bly in May 2006—a trip that in many ways prompted this book. The “soul bridge” also suggests Rumi himself, who crosses cultures and religions and brings us all together, regardless of origin or creed, in the magic of his spiritual caravan.

You that give new life to this planet,

you that transcend logic, come. I am only
an arrow.

Fill your bow with me and let fly.

Because of this love for you
my bowl has fallen from the roof.

Put down a ladder and collect the pieces, please.

People ask, but which roof is your roof?

I answer, wherever the soul came from

and wherever it goes at night, my roof
is in that direction.

From wherever spring arrives to heal the ground, from wherever searching rises in a human being.

 

The looking itself is a trace of what we are looking for.

But we have been more like the man
who sits on his donkey
and asks the donkey where to go.

Be quiet now and wait.

It may be that the ocean one,

the one we desire so to move into and become,

desires us out here on land a little longer,
going our sundry roads to the shore.

Coleman writes, “I wrote this book to celebrate Rumi’s 800th birthday with, hopefully, a continuously unfolding metaphor that has several interchangeable parts: the Khajou Bridge in Ispahan, Rumi’s poetry, this human sojourn, a May evening of hearing the silence that we remember when we sit by water, and that intricate silence itself. It is a grandiose, imperfect gift. I am hoping it will inspire spontaneity in someone. Rumi’s poems are just what they are, nourishment for the soul. Let someone else explicate them. I want to move with their motions.”

Also by Coleman Barks are The Soul of Rumi and Rumi: The Book of Love.

 

 

Publisher’s Description: 

2007 is the "Year of Rumi," and who better than Coleman Barks, Rumi's unlikely, supremely passionate ambassador, to mark the milestone of this great poet's 800th birthday? Barks, who was recently awarded an honorary doctorate in Persian language and literature by the University of Tehran for his thirty years of translating Rumi, has collected and translated ninety new poems, most of them never published before in any form. The result is this beautiful edition titled Rumi: Bridge to the Soul. The "bridge" in the title is a reference to the Khajou Bridge in Isphahan, Iran, which Barks visited with Robert Bly in May of 2006a trip that in many ways prompted this book. The "soul bridge" also suggests Rumi himself, who crosses cultures and religions and brings us all together to listen to his words, regardless of origin or creed. Open this book and let Rumi's poetry carry you into the interior silence and joy of the spirit, the place that unites conscious knowing with a deeper, more soulful understanding.

UNESCO has designated 2007 the Year of Rumi. Rumis poetry, in addition to bridging cultures and religions, serves as a bridge to carry the reader into the interior silence and joy of the soul. His poems bridge the gap between conscious knowing and soul-deep understanding, as well as the chasm between the mystery of being human and the mystery of the divine. In honor of Rumis 800th birthday, here are 90 Coleman Barks translations, 82 of them never before published in any form. 112 pp.

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